contract holds the key

Whilst we continue to hear horror stories how tax payer’s money is wasted on either useless projects or bad management, it is always the poorest and most vulnerable who are made to pay for misdemeanors under this system.

Why can’t tax payers bring class-actions against those who wasted their money? Nobody is ever held responsible for money wasted.

The recent case of the Tower Hamlets school debacle, whereby Tower Hamlets council subsidised a Church of England school to the tune of £18 Million and can’t get the cash back shows there must be a serious problem with contracts.

They rather close the new school and build another one instead of using the one they got and make something of it.

Why can’t public bodies who finance projects protect themselves against loss and why can’t they make beneficiaries liable for losses incurred.

In this case the school governor system is not working well. School governors don’t have a personal liability, so nobody can in fact be held to account.

We have started to deal with excessive salaries some company bosses pay themselves whilst the companies go broke by trying to cap salaries. But in the case of public money wasted on bad decisions there is only one group of people losing out, the homeless, the poor, the vulnerable and the children who get less services.

It is just not good enough, that our laws are not protecting the people but only those who own property.

Governments change more and more frequently so that decisionmakers hardly ever have to take the brunt of incompetences.

Yet whilst on the private basis individuals can trash out contracts to deal with potential losses and/or insure themselves against it, why can’t councils or governments do the same?

It seems that public services is a big melting pot for a distribution of tax payers money that ends up not in the hands of those who don’t need it most.

We do get performance contracts for football club managers or other employees in companies and those not shaping up loose posts and get sacked but in public services a job is a job.

 

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