They’re attacking our food supplies again

With the argument that food supplies make up 20% of global emmissions, the Big Lottery has now funded – on a big scale – a project here in Tower Hamlets that wants to tell people: “Don’t rely on food banks, grow your own food”. See my previous post.

Photo by Taryn Elliott on Pexels.com

This, in effect, makes the situation of poor working class people worst. They are trying to teach you, eat what you can grow locally.

Many residents of Tower Hamlets and indeed throughout Britain rely on large-scale food imports. From rice to spice, it all has to come from far away places.

Unfortunately this new trend is masked up as working on our well-being. Whilst our residents face eviction notices, they are told to grow their own food to save the planet.

Whilst in our area people oppose the building of new housing, they support the growing of own food. Put the two together, you achieve less housing more farming in a place that is called the City of London. Overall the aim of those radical groups is to reduce the population number, reduce the size of cities and ruralisation of our country.

Even if you are a regular coffee house customer and eat out, your restaurant relies on food imports to supply your tasty morsels every day.

The project, which just received major Big Lottery funding has built-in “the Parkview and Cranbrook climate task force”

Previously Extinction Rebellion declared the Glasshouse Community Centre on Parkview Estate as one of their favourite haunts and they use it to prepare props for those large-scale demonstrations that put a stop to life in London as we know it, by blocking traffic and trying to stop commuters boarding trains.

Unfortunately major community organisations in Tower Hamlets have agreed to take part in this project. Of course they do try it first with the poorest as they are the most vulnerable and easiest to draw in.

All those attempts to shut our supermarkets down and replace them with plastic free, self-selection shops failed because the products are not as cheap as the conventional ones.

Whichever way you look at it, the working people, who earn little money need to be able to buy food in the time they have available to do it.

What these projects are doing is telling the poor working class: “Don’t rely on the ‘bad supermarket food’, dont’ rely on food banks, Grow your own food.

If you see how little space there is in an inner-city housing estate or garden to grow food, you would know that any crop would not achieve more than one dinner per harvest. If you have a plot you may achieve a aquivalent of 10 dinners with one large tub of earth.

Just imagine the working person has to do a full shift or work overtime to earn enough and then they cannot even pop into a shop to buy food but they have to make do with what they grow at home.

 

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