learning responsibility

The longer children do not need to stand on their own two feet and can rely on provision of care from parents, the longer those kids will not need to learn the basics of life.

Unfortunately in schools these days, children still do not learn about

  • household budgeting
  • banking and debts
  • living costs and organising accommodation

The majority of children do not grow up in households where the family has a business to run, so that children automatically get involved in the business principles because they hear their parents and other family members talk about this frequently.

Most children live in households where parents are either self-employed or employed.

Photo by Andrew Neel on Pexels.com

Due to the way kids are schooled also, which means children spend at least 8 hours per day in school, this does not include the travel to school and parents spend at least 8 hours at work, children and parents do not see much of each other.

Most parents work in excess of 8 hours per day.

There is less time for conversations in families these days. Quality time is often spend on outings, if people can afford this. Kids also have gaming systems or go to sports clubs, spend time with friends.

Kids generally do not tend to develop much interest on how

  • direct debits affect the household budget
  • rents, rates, other bills have to be paid
  • cost of energy, water
  • clothing, school uniform

Hence, if kids then also get free university education and again get everything organised and provided for, they still do not have to learn the basic life necessities about paying and earning what we spend. Those university loans and letters to repay the cost of education, provide an essential down-to-earth effect.

Of course there are schemes whereby banks for example try to provide school schemes, whereby a school pupils runs savings schemes for pupils with help from a bank but many schools are not taking up that possibility.

I often think that my children never imagined how expensive life on their own actually is because they never thought about this much.

Just getting washing done and installing a machine in student accommodation is something that is taken for granted. How to deal with repairs when they are needed.

And how much time it actually takes to do daily chores.

I think that kids, who do not get enough reality training are more likely to get involved in troublesome activities like demonstrations, which can end in tragedy.

I thought about this again and again when I compared the beginning of the German Baader-Meinhof group and movement with today’s Extinction Rebellion demos. They both try to sell radicalisation as a necessity to the general public.

Both look similar to me,

  • the mass appeal
  • large demonstrations
  • the causes

Just that in Germany university education was and remains free and many students were mainly attracted to the radical ideas of the day and today, Extinction rebellion are trying exactly to recreate this mass appeal on issues that speak to us all. They even use 85% naked women to sell their appeal to the public and police officers attending.

I think it is more than sick to combine sexy models with blood red paint being spattered onto buildings.

However, in Britain it seems that those at least who have to work and have their daily lives interrupted question the benefit of attending those demos, which get increasingly radical with now blood marches for example and incidentally one solicitor is accused of injecting foods in local shops with blood at the same time.

Radicalisation can be due to a lack of reality sense, which can be exacerbated by a feeling of safety because being cared for by provision either by parents or government makes children feel safe regardless of what they do.

I think British law is pretty good both in the sense of radicalisation provision as well as trying to make things not too easy for people.

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