decision-making process

Emotional dependance is often the cause of people getting themselves involved with criminal people, who manipulate a person to commit to wrong-doing systematically.

On the other hand, quick thinking and getting involved would have saved me £10 on the Lidl Christmas jumper.

Yesterday it was in the shelves for £7.99, I walked past and today it wasn’t there was I wanted it. So I had to spend £18.10 to get it from eBay.

Since I do a lot of shopping in Lidl, which is just across the road from me, I didn’t realise how much I needed to get this jumper to make my Christmas feel OK. That’s a form of emotional dependance.

Whilst I now watch a Panorama film about an American woman going to Syria with her husband and getting back – after he had been killed in Syria – to the US and being prosecuted for terrorism. Title: “return from Isis”.

I am grateful that my emotional dependance, at it’s worst, only ever got me to spend extra money for a Lidl Christmas jumper, whilst otherwise I am much to do about law and order in Britain.

If it was against the law to go shopping in Lidl, as a former EU trading partner, I probably woulnd’t do it, but is is lawful and so its’ OK to do it.

Unfortunately not all people think whether their actions are lawful and get themselves involved in wrong-doing, that becomes unravelled over time and leads to imprisonment or worst.

Unfortunately the BBC serial East Enders is much more positive about involvement with crime in Britain and doesn’t show the pitfalls of doing wrong as clearly as they show the pitfalls of getting involved with Isis, ending up in death and imprisonment.

I think that American woman could raise the funds to get back from Syria with her children, whilst Shamima Begum, currently can’t raise the money or facilitate her return and she is being prevented from coming baack and also her children had died in Syria.

If young people only tought advice from their peers prior to making life-changing decisions, that would save them a lot of problems and prevent loss of life.

Blog Stats

  • 55,006 hits
%d bloggers like this: