I’ve fallen victim

I cannot believe that I’ve finally fallen for a phishing scam. I am normally very aware and spot scams straightaway but on this occasion I fell for it.

I think for many of us, during lock-down, waiting for parcels is just about the only entertainment we’ll get. But then there are scammers who pretend to wanting to re-deliver missed parcels just on a day when we are expecting one.

It’s happened twice now, that on a day, I expected a parcel, that I got either a card through the coor or a text inviting me to rebook delivery against a fee.

Both times from scammers.

What surprises me the most, that this latest text scam actually only asks for

  • Date of Brith
  • Name and address
  • date for re-delivery

they did not want payment information.

I am asking who would want such iformation. For any British company that information is easy enough to come by as most of us are on many databases. They just want to harvest basic identity details.

I assume those scammers are from other cultures, countries or from criminal networks from abroad. People can hardly steal my identity because my name is pretty unusual for Britain.

But there we are, nobody is immune against a drop of the guard at some time. Because when we are busy and do three things at wonce, our biggest fear nowadays is that we miss the parcel delivery because it could have been too noisy or something like that. Then that scammer text offering re-delivery feels like soothing of the soul. Keep on the lookout.

Forward all phishing email to report@phishing.gov.uk you can also send them a copy of phishing texts with the number it came from.

Phishing again

I received texts yesterday asking me to verify that I made a payment via my bank account. What I found very amazing is, that somebody managed to purchase URLs with the beginning of HSBC.

I went onto my Internet service provider and searched for URLs beginning with HSBC and none apparently were available. I just wonder where those scammers are able to buy such URL names. Perhaps in some remote country from some strange provider?

It is really up to those selling URL names to ensure that no banking URLs can be bought by anybody but the bank itself.

What became apparent yesterday is that the person who had bought the fraudulent URL and put up a website, looking exactly like the HSBC log in page, managed to buy not only one but two URLs beginning with HSBC then a dot and then some business like phrase.

They first send the first text with the first URL and then 1 hour later another text with a similar sounding URL. The texts came from two non-withheld UK mobile phone numbers, probably burner phones.

Of course it is important that people report such phishing scams to their banks straight away. The quicker those are taken down, the less people fall pray to such scams.

It is relatively easy to put up false websites. It is easy to copy graphics and display them and then put a form onto that website and harvest input information. But if people cannot buy the URL in the first place, the scam becomes much harder to do.

I know all that stuff because I have been a webmaster for over 10 years.

13 seconds

On average it takes me about 13 seconds after receipt of a phishing phone call to hang up. The same is happening about abusive phone calls.

Amazing to see that when I post some things, how long it takes for a stupid phone call to come in.

There is a clear connection.

I received one of these calls after this mornings’ posts. I leave it to anybody’s imagination where that call could have come from.

My phone numbers are widely available. Obviously anybody could be calling but motive and timing is always a giveaway.

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